Research projects 6

The aim of the BIOBM project is to investigate the transition to the bioeconomy as a profound change in production and usage, as well as in doing business and consumption. The study is driven by the social, ecological and economic considerations of a sustainable bioeconomy which call for rethinking how we define and utilize resources, how value is created in a networked world and how the circular processes of bio-based and other material flows connect in novel ways. Our aim is to identify the characteristics of successful business models of born globals for a sustainable bioeconomy.

Team

Mika Gabrielsson, Saara Julkunen, Emma Incze, Sara Fraccastoro, Jouni Pykäläinen, Päivi Pelli, Anu Laakkonen

  • Head of research N/A
  • Language n/a

YAKSHA supports current EU-ASEAN cooperation dialogue, which include security and defence, with emphasis on non-traditional areas, such as cybersecurity. YAKSHA develop software to prevent cybercrime in the ASEAN region, leveraging EU-ASEAN knowledge and most recent technology advances to reach this goal. YAKSHA will implement true collaboration in the field, co-creating technologies that are able to respond to real user requirements and needs. Through a series of events, YAKSHA will promote knowledge sharing as well as will develop a business ecosystem of partners to commercialize the solution after end of the project.

Team

Maria Lima Toivanen, Nina Rilla, Jouko Myllyoja, Jarno Salonen, Jani Suomalainen, Jukka Hemilä

  • Head of research Sara Lindeman
  • Language n/a

The world needs hands on solutions to wicked problems such as climate change, resource scarcity and poverty, and we need to nd the pathways that enable such solutions to emerge. To maintain competitiveness in the future, Finland needs to improve it’s capacity to innovate and collaborate in new ways, to provide holistic and sustainable solutions to global challenges, both in emerging markets as well as disruptive new approaches to service provision in Europe. New global studies frugal and reverse innovations in complex global systems.

Team

Minna Halme, Teija Lehtonen, Jarkko Levänen, Helena Sandman, Emma Nkonoki, Tatu Lyytinen, Anne Hyvärinen, Sini Numminen, Sini Suomalainen, Marleen Wierenga, Marko Keskinen, Peter Lund, Olli Varis

  • Head of research Roger Behrens, U of Cape Town
  • Language n/a

Phase I of this project was to understand the business models, governance structures and public perceptions of the the informal and paratransit sectors of public transport in three case study cities: Cape Town, Nairobi and Dar es Salaam. Phase II, still unfunded, is to provide some low cost solutions or partial solutions to deficiencies identified in Phase I.

Team

Marianne Vanderschuren, U of Cape Town, Romano Del Mistro, U of Cape Town, Dorothy McCormack, U of Nairobi, David Mfinanga, U of Dar Es Salaam, Eric Bruun, Aalto University

Bringing together advanced mobile voice-based technology, service providers and rural people of India in a tailored ecosystem is a unique project both in scale and in approach. Our project – RuralVoice – focuses on the development and deployment of voice-based services in agriculture, healthcare, education, entertainment and banking for the 220 million illiterate and underprivileged Indians that reside in the rural area. In our Indo-Finnish project consortium we are also building sustainable development and inclusive business opportunities for service- and technology companies both in India and in Europe. Keywords: Sustainable development, India, base of the pyramid, frugal innovations, voice-based services, illiterate people, mobile applications, participation, collaboration, localisation

Team

Mikko Ruohonen, Markku Turunen, Juhani Linna, Sumita Sharma, Nicholas Mavengere, Gururaj Mahajan, Jaakko Hakulinen, Pekka Kallioniemi, Vivek Kumar, Himadri Das (India), Amit Nanavati (India), Nitendra Rajput (India)

Marketing channels of agricultural surplus is important for improving food security in most African countries. The cooperative business form offers one way for smallholder and intermediate size farmers to sell their surplus. Twelve Tanzanian cooperatives were studied by semi-structured interviews to find out if the cooperative business model can reduce poverty and address food security. Four types of cooperatives were identified: traditional cooperatives, reforming cooperatives, new cooperatives and co-operatives with some innovations. Both cases of poorly working unions and more recent success stories were found. Features characterizing good cooperative work in Tanzania were identified. Recommendations on policy level how to support cooperative action is given.

Team

John Sumelius; Faustine K. Bee; Suleman A. Chambo; Shimelles Tenaw; Stefan Bäckman,