Research projects 8

  • Head of research Hannu Korhonen, Martti Esala, Mila Sell
  • Language n/a

FoodAfrica is a research and development Programme enhancing food security in West and East Africa. The objective of the Programme is to provide new knowledge and tools for researchers, decision makers and local farmers to improve local food security. The FoodAfrica Programme is implemented in six countries: Benin, Ghana, Cameroon, Kenya, Senegal, and Uganda. The programme focuses on the following topics: Strengthening capacity for diagnosis and management of soil micronutrient deficiencies in Sub Saharan Africa for improved plant, animal and human nutrition (WP1, more than 20 African countries involved). Dairy cattle breeding in West Africa: identifying and promoting appropriate breeds and breed combinations or genotypes for smallholder farmers (WP2, Senegal). Economic analysis of technologies and targeted policies to reduce vulnerability and building resilience (WP3, Senegal). Enhancing food and nutrition security of vulnerable groups in communities through increased use of local agricultural biodiversity (WP4, Benin) Measuring and mitigating the risk of mycotoxins for poor milk and maize producers and consumers (WP5, Kenya). Improving market access and food security in Africa with information and communication technology (WP6, Ghana & Uganda) Innovative extension approaches for improving food security and livelihoods (WP7, Cameroon & Kenya).

LEAP-Agri is a joint Europe Africa Research and Innovation (R&I) initiative related to Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainable Agriculture (FNSSA). 30 partners, including 24 Ministries and Funding Agencies (Group of Funders) from 18 European and African countries decide to join their forces and funding to build an ERA-Net Cofund project with a financial support of the European Commission. The project has two pillars, (i) funding R&I projects on FNSSA, and (ii) Feeding the long-term EU- AU partnership on FNSSA.

PRE-LEAP-RE aims to contribute to identifying and formulating a strategic jointly designed Research and Innovation Agenda for renewable energy (RE) collaboration between Europe and Africa and establishing the organizational principles for its implementation in a forthcoming Joint Programme. The project will bringing together national funding agencies from EU and African States, involving key European and African actors of energy research. The key anticipated outcome of the PRE-LEAP-RE project is a European Joint Programme (EJP) in the field of RE.

  • Head of research Professor Elizabeth L. Rose
  • Language n/a

Spurred by the quest for improved performance, industrial firms have often embraced the international market, consequent to which they are continually embroiled in cross-border competitive rivalries in multiple markets. Against this backdrop, this study explores the cross-border investment location choices and competitive interactions of mobile network operators (MNOs) in Sub-Saharan Africa, with particular focus on the 16 such firms that had proven significant presence across multiple countries in the region as of 2014.

  • Head of research Professor Elizabeth L. Rose
  • Language n/a

Given the growing importance of mobile telecoms in the economy of the fast-emerging Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), this research aims at exploring the multimarket competition strategies of the mobile network operators (MNOs) with cross-border activities in the region. It is, therefore, expected that the findings emanating from the study would deepen our present understanding of internationalization and multimarket competition, drawing from mobile telecoms in the emerging region context.

  • Head of research Yitagesu Tekle
  • Language n/a

This study aims to investigate and analyze the current and future drivers of deforestation and forest degradation in Cameroon and Republic of the Congo, and to discuss policy implications. The study also aims to analyze how drivers of deforestation and forest degradation have changed over the past 10 years; and investigate major challenges and barriers to address drivers of deforestation and forest degradation.

  • Head of research Prof. Osmo Kivinen
  • Language n/a

The research is done in towards a doctoral dissertation. The study is focused on the Cameroon higher education system. The objective is to identify the strategic objectives of higher education in Cameroon; how they are determined and implemented at the system and institutional levels. The balanced scorecard (BSC) approach will then be used to show how the determination and implementation and evaluation of strategic objectives can be facilitated by the BSC approach.The endpoints would be to: -Highlight the feasibility of the BSC approach to the Cameroonian higher education -Determine the structural capacity of the Cameroonian Higher Education System to use the BSC in determining, implementing and evaluating its strategic objectives. -Outline a System and Institutional BSC for Cameroon based on the data from interviews and document reviews. To achieve this, policy document reviews and qualitative semi-structured interviews are conducted with policy makers and then one higher education institution.

  • Head of research Elvis Fokala
  • Language n/a

Central to this study is the general accepted opinion that the lack of personal participation in decision-making processes affecting the wellbeing of a particular individual in any given community is a deep-seated threat to that individual’s human rights. Participation largely can refer to several aspects of contributing (opinion) or playing (action) a part in something. In most cases though, it involves taking part in an activity, and/or specifically to taking part in decision-making process concerning a particular activity. Generally, key to the philosophy of what exactly constitutes the right to participation of every human being, is arguably the fact that this right “lies in the core of democratic government based on the conduct of people and in conformity with the Principles” of international human rights law. Surely, this is a point all African governments agree on. In fact, the principles guiding this particular right are expressly worded in the oldest and most accepted human rights instruments. For instance, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) have both unambiguously, protected and promoted the right of “every citizen” to participate in all affairs within their communities.