Research projects 9

  • Head of research Saila Saaristo
  • Language n/a

This study explores inequalities in access to housing. In the light of the premise "Leave no one behind", the case study on occupations and struggle against evictions in social housing estates of Lisbon metropolitan area (LMA) draws the attention to the groups of population that are excluded from access to housing. In particular, gendered and racialised aspects of housing exclusions are examined. In addition, the role of civil society in contesting housing exclusion is analysed.

Team

Saila-Maria Saaristo

This project aims at rethinking ways of reading and writing change in African gender history. Looking at oral historical narratives and the transgenerational communication of historical knowledge among the Yaawo-speaking people in northern Mozambique, it brings the study of gender in African deeper pasts in dialogue with a cultural analysis of the contemporary historical moment. My starting argument is that our understanding of the contemporary historical moment in African gender history is strongly framed by the gender and development models of the social sciences which emphasize women’s struggle for gender equality in relation to men. This understanding influences the way in which we approach the past and write our research narratives. Through this history writing, women’s historical experiences become fixed within teleological narratives of ‘liberation’ (/‘oppression’). The past is distanced from the present along a linear path, and what is termed the ‘precolonial past’ is isolated as a separate unit of study. In my research, I seek to challenge this temporal model and explore new ways to read and write gendered histories that more fully capture the multiplicity of the gendered temporalities that constitute African existence. Overall, my study has a two-fold objective: Firstly, on the basis of the Yaawo oral historical narratives, it aims to contribute to our understanding of female political and spiritual power in Africa’s precolonial past and the historical processes of change in the colonial and postcolonial contexts. Secondly, I will study how these deeper histories also echo and are reworked in the present and thus constitute the contemporary historical experience in interaction with, for instance, more recent socialist ideas of women’s emancipation and the current development discourse on gender equality. Overall, my research proposes to open new routes in the theoretical thinking as well as the methodologies of African gender history.

Team

Emerging technologies such as affordable smart phones with 4G access, broadband internet, and interactive interfaces employing gestures or speech, are revolutionizing the ways we access information, learn new skills and interact with the world around us. However, developing world communities - who stand to benefit from such technologies - were, until recently, largely neglected. Interactive technologies provide a means to address learning challenges such as functional illiteracy and information access barriers, and can improve learning and education, health and wellbeing, and agricultural practices.

Team

Markku Turunen, Jaakko Hakulinen, Mikko Ruohonen, Sumita Sharma, Pekka Kallioniemi, Juhani Linna

The project seeks to increase Mozambican research capacity on forestry, sustainable natural resource and land-use planning considering different aspects of impacts (ecological, social and economic). In addition to joint teaching activities, it includes collaborative research on environmental and socio-economic aspects of forestry and natural resources management. The fieldwork activities take place in Manica and Zambézia Provinces.

Team

Almeida Sitoe, Valério Macandza, Ana Monteiro, Luis Cristovão, Elisa Vallius, Anssi Lensu, Irmeli Mustalahti

This research focuses on FBOs (World Vision, Fida International and Free Pentecostal Church of Tanzania) and their development projects by employing the capability approach and examining how the faith base influences assessments of valued functionings as aspects of good life, capabilities, and freedoms. Research is based on fieldwork in several regions in Tanzania.

Team

The project is part of All Children Reading - A Grand Challenge for Development innovation competition by World Vision, USAID and Australian Aid. The purpose of the project is to pilot mobile teacher training service for better literacy instruction in Zambian languages.

Team

The aim of the CAPOLSA project is to establish a strong literacy centre with international visibility and impact, specifically in African countries facing similar challenges to Zambia. The literacy training approach is based on the Grapho Learning Initiative and the innovative and efficient digital-based learning game, GraphoGame that has been developed based on scientific studies led by Professor Heikki Lyytinen.  THe project was funded by the Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs through the HEI ICI programme. Project Award Number: HEI ICI‐2010‐P1‐000153

Team

Professor Heikki Lyytinen, Professor Robert Serpell, Head of Planning & Development Päivi Fadjukoff

The ongoing CAPOLSA Phase II project completes the capacity building in CAPOLSA Phase I and needed for reaching the final goal of the ongoing action to help as many children as possible in Sub-Sahara Africa to learn the basic skills, and be able to have appropriate reading skills to acquire functional literacy by being offered appropriate reading material. Together with the training of coordinators for distribution of literacy support throughout Zambia and its neighbouring countries, the project builds skills and networks to overcome the complete lack of reading material which children who have just learned to read have to have. 1. The Capolsa Centre works as a national help centre in Zambia for the tens of thousands of first grade teachers who will be using small tablet computers that Grapholearn Initiative for optimal learning results as well as the learning-game based reading practicing environments (Graphogame). It also serves as the whole Sub-Saharan resource centre in order to extend the reach of their expertise eventually to all the countries in Sub-Sahara area.

Team

Prof. Lyytinen´s research team has developed a science-based, digital learning game to help children to learn to read. The game is based on our 20 years of scientific work in Jyväskylä longitudinal research on dyslexia. The Grapho Learning International Development project aims to co-create a sustainable model to deliver GraphoGame service to new countries. In Africa the research group has long term cooperation with many Higher Education Institutions. Current activities are focused in Kenya, Namibia, Tanzania and Zambia. In Latin America the aim is to deliver new GraphoGame versions in Chile, Peru, Brazil and Mexico.

Team

Prof. Heikki Lyytinen, Prof. Ulla Richardson, Head of Project Management Mikko Pitkänen, Project Planning Officer Isa Niukkala