Sabine Burghart

University Lecturer

  • Institution University of Turku
  • Department/faculty Centre for East Asian Studies

(1) South Korea’s official development assistance in East Africa South Korea’s role in its recent development partnership with a focus on the Global Saema?l Undong (New Village Movement, SMU) programme. South Korea's official donor rhetoric points towards more symmetric aid relationships: emphasis on national ownership, request-based approach, notions of self-reliance and non-hierarchical relationships. Tanzania’s experience with the SMU programme has been selected for an in-depth case study. (2) International aid and institutional development in North Korea The interaction between international aid actors, the DPRK government and beneficiaries has resulted in the emergence of – what institutional theorists call – a ‘new field’. Using qualitative research methods, this research project identifies, categorizes and discusses a set of endogenously grown institutions in the DPRK that have emerged as part of the ‘new field’.

Juhani Koponen

Professor emeritus

  • Institution University of Helsinki
  • Department/faculty Global Development Studies

After my retirement I'm on professorial contract continuing to conduct research and supervise PhD students in Global Development Studies at the University of Helsinki. My own research areas include histories of global development, Finnish development cooperation and Tanzanian long-term development history. I supervise students whose topics are in some way related to any of these.

Elina Lehtomäki

Team leader

  • Institution University of Jyväskylä
  • Department/faculty Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy

Eva Nilsson

PhD Researcher

  • Institution Hanken School of Economics
  • Department/faculty Management and Organisation

I am doing PhD research on corporate responsibility in African states with a case study focused on a large investment by multinational oil and gas companies in Tanzania. I am a political scientist (MSocSc World Politics, MSc African Politics) and now working within the field of management and politics. Previously, I have worked as an advisor within development cooperation, and have rich experience of development policy, especially in relation to global economics and finance.

Paula Paukku

Master's Student

  • Institution Tampere University
  • Department/faculty Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences (ITC)

BSc Sociology and Media Studies, undertaking her master's degree in Journalism. Research topic: Journalism Education in Tanzania.

Tuulikki Pietilä

University Lecturer

  • Institution University of Helsinki
  • Department/faculty Social and Cultural Anthropology/ Social Sciences

I am an anthropologist with a long and multifaceted experience in researching Africa and in acting as the PI for research projects on Africa. Thematically I have examined various societal changes that take place in the coming together of global and local regimes of economic and socio-cultural value. My specific research topics include the following: women traders and socio-economic empowerment in Tanzania; youth cultures' and culture industries' social and economic significance in South Africa; music industry structures, practices and value chains in South Africa and Europe; clothing and fashion industry-related entrepreneurships in South Africa and Tanzania; emerging black middle classes. I am fluent in KiSwahili language.

Projects

Youth music and the construction of social subjectivities and communities in post-apartheid South Africa

Hanna Posti-Ahokas

Senior Researcher

  • Institution University of Jyväskylä
  • Department/faculty Faculty of Education and Psychology

Current research on internationalization of higher education through North-South collaboration. Lead and participated in various collaboration projects with Universities from Tanzania, Ghana, South Africa and Eritrea.

Saila-Maria Saaristo

PhD Researcher

  • Institution University of Helsinki
  • Department/faculty Global development studies

Saila-Maria Saaristo is a doctoral researcher and lecturer in Global Development Studies at the University of Helsinki, and a member of Urbaria (Helsinki Institute of Urban and Regional Studies). Her current research project focuses on studying inequalities and discriminations, which are approached through the case of inequalities in access to housing, with a particular focus on homelessness and forced evictions. The study investigates especially gendered, classed and racialised housing exclusions. In addition to the academic career, Saaristo has worked extensively as a consultor, manager and coordinator of different kinds of international cooperation projects financed by the European Union and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland, in the areas of urban development and housing, civil society, good governance and democracy, human rights, and gender. She has worked and lived in many countries, including Cape Verde, Tanzania, Mozambique, Brazil, Bolivia and Portugal.

Projects

Transformative Actions? Occupations and Evictions in Lisbon Metropolitan Area, Portugal

Patrick Shulist

Assistant Professor of Sustainability in Business

  • Institution Aalto University
  • Department/faculty Business School, Entrepreneurship

My research has two main streams, both of which focus on international development and poverty alleviation in sub-Saharan Africa. First, I take a qualitative approach to understanding the “natural” course of entrepreneurship in Ghana; that is, how entrepreneurship happens in the absence of international development efforts. This research stream grew out of my frustration with seeing development organizations consistently teaching entrepreneurship in sub-Saharan Africa in much the same way it is taught in Canada, or Finland. My second research stream focuses on collaboratively working with international development organizations to solve their pressing challenges. This generally involves using randomized field experiments to test designed solutions under real-world characteristics. The goal here is to bridge the gap between producing work that is theoretically interesting, and producing work that is practically important. Two ongoing projects of this nature are happening in Ghana and Tanzania.