Research projects 6

  • Head of research Sini Numminen
  • Language n/a

The doctoral research project targets to understand the relevance of frugal and affordable energy innovations in sustainable energy transitions among low-income communities in emerging economies. The target technology is solar micro-grids in India. The various related sustainability challenges are studied as well as the role of distributed energy in the country's energy mix among rural energy users. Key methods include field trials, interviews, data analysis and sustainability and reliability assessments.

Team

  • Head of research N/A
  • Language n/a

YAKSHA supports current EU-ASEAN cooperation dialogue, which include security and defence, with emphasis on non-traditional areas, such as cybersecurity. YAKSHA develop software to prevent cybercrime in the ASEAN region, leveraging EU-ASEAN knowledge and most recent technology advances to reach this goal. YAKSHA will implement true collaboration in the field, co-creating technologies that are able to respond to real user requirements and needs. Through a series of events, YAKSHA will promote knowledge sharing as well as will develop a business ecosystem of partners to commercialize the solution after end of the project.

Team

Maria Lima Toivanen, Nina Rilla, Jouko Myllyoja, Jarno Salonen, Jani Suomalainen, Jukka Hemilä

  • Head of research Sirkka Heinonen
  • Language n/a

The foresight part of NEO-CARBON ENERGY explores possible futures of a new renewables-based energy production and storage system, which is being developed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and University of Turku – Finland Futures Research Centre (FFRC). This joint research project is one of the strategic research openings of Tekes – The Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation. The foresight work is conducted in the Finland Futures Research Centre. A possibly distributed energy production system of neo-/low-carbon technologies and emerging issues such as prosumerism can drive economic, political, cultural and social changes. Radically new innovations, services and practices could emerge as a result of the third industrial revolution.

Team

Sirkka Heinonen, Juho Ruotsalainen, Joni Karjalainen, Marjukka Parkkinen

  • Head of research Markku Juntti
  • Language n/a

As of the time 14:46, March 11, 2011, Tohoku, Japan was hit by a massive earthquake. The epicentre of the earthquake was located to be undersea off the coast of Japan, and the magnitude-level was 9.0. The first earthquake also triggered a series of subsequent big earthquakes. Altogether, these earthquakes caused huge trembling on the Japanese mainland, reaching magnitude-level 7 at Kurihara City in the Miyagi prefecture, and Level 6 across many places in Tohoku. Following these huge earthquakes, those areas facing to the Pacific Ocean over the entire Tohoku area and also a northern part of Kanto areas were hit by unpredictably huge Tsunami waves of up to 40 m height. While travelling up 10 km inland, these waves caused thousands of deaths and severe damage of private and public infrastructure.

Team

Tadashi Matsumoto

  • Head of research Matti Latva-aho
  • Language n/a

In this project, we aim at developing a new theory for the new generation of electric power systems, also known as smart grids. Such a technology uses the information and communication technologies to exchange data within the grid, allowing for interactions between its elements as well as the humans who also play an important role. These interactions form a network structure among the diverse system elements based on fixed rules (e.g. physical laws) and adaptive relation rules guided by the available (estimated, filtered and/or processed) information (e.g. human behavior). Therefore, we need to go further than the simple analysis of the technology and thus we should include the human interactions with the power grid to have a proper picture of its dynamics.

Team

Pedro Nardelli, Florian Kühnlenz

  • Head of research Jari Iinatti
  • Language n/a

The use of wireless technologies has a lot of potential in finding new home-care related solutions, as well as in improving efficiency in hospitals. Number of applications is monifold both in medical and healthcare, e.g., a possibility of monitoring parameters at home and hospital. Self-care, selfmanagement and cost effectiveness will be the key factors towards the development of these new technological solutions. One example of utilizing wireless technologies leads to distributed hospital concept, in which measurement done at home are sent automatically to healthcare units database, and doctors or nursing staff obtain alarms when necessary. Wireless body area networks (WBAN) have been seen as a future implementation scheme of measuring human physiological parameters. Small and low power sensors installed on-body, or even in-body, are connected to each other and out-of-body using energy efficient wireless communication technique. Wireless connection will allow patients to move around, but still allowing the controlling capability of the nursing staff. The developed system can be transferred from hospitals to home due to the well defined interfaces between the WBAN and the access point of backbone network. In the project, suitable transceivers and network solutions for WBANs are investigated starting form channel models

Team

Ryuji Kohno (YNU)