Research projects 252

In this project, solar concentrating power production systems and technologies are developed. The focus is on new innovations to bring this solar technology closer to commercialisation. A new type of concentrator, the so-called beam-down 2-stage concentrator, has been developed. It can be equipped with an integrated thermal (high-temperature) storage to provide dispatchable power operation. Up to 40% solar conversion efficiency can be reached.

Team

Wang Jun, Song Yang, Wang Jiangping

This research concerns socio-technical issues for providing solar electricity into rural India. Several solar pico-grid systems have been implemented in villages accompanied with comprehensive data collection, field-trips, interviews, and analysis. Research questions have included behavioural aspects with use of solar electricity in the rural context, system reliability, and system optimisations. Key results include observations that reliability need more attention and local training, i.e. strengthening frugality aspects; demand response of the rural population showed less correlation with access to solar electricity.

Team

Sini Numminen, Semee Yoon, Johannes Urpelainen

The main purpose of the research in Public-Private Partnerships is to investigate the construction of symbiotic relationships between companies and public entities in the context of energy transition. The principal objectives of my doctoral study will be: (i) to identify the strengths, opportunities, weakness and barriers of PPPs in the context of energy transition, (ii) to investigate how to build symbiotic PPPs, (iii) to investigate how to build a strong stakeholder management strategy. Results from the present research work could provide valuable information for public and private organisation for achieving a very positive impact by strengthening the forms of cooperation between organisations at the local, regional, national and/or international level, to create new business models, to scale up emerging technologies and to create new jobs opportunities.

Team

Giovanna Andrea Pinilla De La Cruz

  • Head of research Anu Kantele
  • Language n/a

Antibiotics have made it possible for people to live longer, healthier lives. Antimicrobial resistance, however, is an increasing problem, especially in low-resource settings. This project will employ a range of methods from microbiology, clinical medicine and sociology to produce new knowledge about how AMR genes spread especially in poor West African regions, in areas where local capacity to address AMR is lagging behind, and identify ways to curb the spread of AMR. This knowledge can be utilized in national and international health policy and medical research.

Team

Isidore Bonkoungou, Victorien Dougnon, Kaisa Haukka, Bourema Kouriba, Salla Sariola, Marko Virta

Teacher Preparation Programme through ODL Mode for Enhancing Quality in Education (TPP-Nepal Project) is a capacity development project between Tribhuvan University, Nepal and JAMK University of Applied Sciences together with HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Finland. The partnership has been established during a previous project, Training of Trainers for the Teacher Qualification Upgrading Programme in Nepal (ToT Nepal), that ended in 2015.

Team

Seija Koskela PhD

Mainstreaming Populism in the 21st Century is a research consortium funded by the Academy of Finland. It is based on collaboration between media and communication studies, as well as political science and political theory researchers at the universities of Helsinki, Jyväskylä and Turku. The research consortium explores different forms of mainstreaming of populism in Europe and the Americas in the 21st century. The project will analyse how populist parties have become part of the mainstream, how other parties have coloured their policies increasingly with a populist streak and how different mainstreaming forms of populism have transformed public debate, the media and democracy in various polities. One of the country case studies in the project focuses on Venezuela. This sub project is conducted by Salojärvi.

Team

This project is a doctoral study aimed at designing a smart learning environment (SLE) for programming education at higher education institutions in Nigeria context. The research hopes to make computing and programming education, an interesting learning experience. It will bridge the gap that exists between students with a programming background and those without by personalizing and adapting to learners preferred style. Besides, the use of SLE for computing education in the context of developing countries have not hitherto received much attention; this research tries to delve into the specific application of this 21st-century learning technology for computer programming knowledge. Thus, allowing indigenous students to develop their problem-solving capability, algorithmic thinking, and solve computational tasks, and consequently become local content developers and solution providers. With the experiences of researchers at the EdTech group of the school of computing, University of Eastern Finland, the project is envisaged to solve the problem of individualized learning by encouraging collaborative learning, motivating students to share their learning experiences. At the end of the research, we hope to make programming courses accessible and interesting to students especially novices; motivate learners to learn and practice their programming skills.

Team

Professor Markku Tukiainen, Dr. Jarkko Suhonen, Dr. Solomon Oyelere, Mr. Friday Joseph Agbo

  • Head of research Matti Heiliö
  • Language n/a

The purpose of this Project was to strengthen HEIs in East-Africa as developmentally responsive institutions by enhancing curriculum development, pedagogical approach and capacity of staff in the area of mathematics education and teacher preparation. The invigoration and modernisation of teacher training and the upgrading of curricula was meant to increase the level and enrollment of mathematics education, give a push forward to the education of mathematics teachers and support the universities' ability to embark on development projects with the surrounding society, industry and public governance.

Team

Matti Heiliö, Matylda Jablonska-Sabuka, Tuomo Kauranne, Heikki Haario, Miika Tolonen

  • Head of research Hannu Korhonen, Martti Esala, Mila Sell
  • Language n/a

FoodAfrica is a research and development Programme enhancing food security in West and East Africa. The objective of the Programme is to provide new knowledge and tools for researchers, decision makers and local farmers to improve local food security. The FoodAfrica Programme is implemented in six countries: Benin, Ghana, Cameroon, Kenya, Senegal, and Uganda. The programme focuses on the following topics: Strengthening capacity for diagnosis and management of soil micronutrient deficiencies in Sub Saharan Africa for improved plant, animal and human nutrition (WP1, more than 20 African countries involved). Dairy cattle breeding in West Africa: identifying and promoting appropriate breeds and breed combinations or genotypes for smallholder farmers (WP2, Senegal). Economic analysis of technologies and targeted policies to reduce vulnerability and building resilience (WP3, Senegal). Enhancing food and nutrition security of vulnerable groups in communities through increased use of local agricultural biodiversity (WP4, Benin) Measuring and mitigating the risk of mycotoxins for poor milk and maize producers and consumers (WP5, Kenya). Improving market access and food security in Africa with information and communication technology (WP6, Ghana & Uganda) Innovative extension approaches for improving food security and livelihoods (WP7, Cameroon & Kenya).

Team

Hannu Korhonen, Martti Esala, Mila Sell, Jarkko Niemi, Susanna Rokka, Niina Pitkänen, Anna-Riitta Lund, Mikko Salmi, Keith Shepherd, Miika Tapio, Karen Marshall, Siwa Msangi, Marja Mutanen, Delia Grace, Erastus Kang´ethe, Nick Minot, Eija Laitinen, Steven Franzel, Celine Termote, Vivian Hoffmann, Johanna Lindahl, Vesa Joutsjoki

Emerging technologies such as affordable smart phones with 4G access, broadband internet, and interactive interfaces employing gestures or speech, are revolutionizing the ways we access information, learn new skills and interact with the world around us. However, developing world communities - who stand to benefit from such technologies - were, until recently, largely neglected. Interactive technologies provide a means to address learning challenges such as functional illiteracy and information access barriers, and can improve learning and education, health and wellbeing, and agricultural practices.

Team

Markku Turunen, Jaakko Hakulinen, Mikko Ruohonen, Sumita Sharma, Pekka Kallioniemi, Juhani Linna